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Webinar: Anti-Money Laundering – Are the Measures Too Much of a Good Thing?

March 26, 2020, 12:00 - 1:00 PM

Synopsis:

Government is focused on reducing unlawful conduct by making it less profitable. The BC Civil Forfeiture Act is one of the tools it uses in this quest. The Act is broad as to the scope of conduct that triggers forfeiture and broad as to the property that can be confiscated. It allows forfeiture on low levels of proof and with little due process. Are your clients’ purchases safe? How about your fees/commissions? How about your client’s and your other assets?  Has the government gone too far? What can you do (or avoid doing) to better keep your clients and yourself out of reach?

Presented by Ray Basi, Director of Education and Policy for the Mortgage Brokers Association of British Columbia and Mortgage Brokers Institute of British Columbia:

Webinars/ray-basi.jpgRay Basi has been the Director of Education and Policy for the Mortgage Brokers Association of British Columbia and Mortgage Brokers Institute of British Columbia since late 2014. He writes and delivers written and oral courses for the mortgage broker industry. He is one of the primary contributors to Canadian Mortgage Broker magazine, often writing on topics that impact the way mortgage brokers in Canada better practice and better protect themselves and their clients. He assists in reviewing and proposing policy changes impacting mortgage brokers. 

He has several years experience in the areas of freedom of information and protection of privacy as an analyst, manager, and director with the provincial government; most recently with the Financial Institutions Commission (now named the BC Financial Services Authority). 

He was a lawyer in private practice for approximately 16 years. His practice considerably focused on the law surrounding real estate transactions, including the law surrounding mortgages and mortgage brokering. 

He is a graduate of Simon Fraser University, having earned a First Class Honours Degree in Criminology with an emphasis on policy analysis and reform.  He furthered these interests with a law degree from the University of Victoria.