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News > Upcoming SFU Vancouver Events - Week of October 31 - November 7

Upcoming SFU Vancouver Events - Week of October 31 - November 7

posted on 1:02 PM, October 31, 2014

Coming up next week at SFU Vancouver:

Thursday, October 30:  WAR for TALENT
Time: 2pm   Place: Rm. 1600, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free  register

Business success these days relies heavily on what are called “talents”. However, there are gaps between the kind of talent that industry expects and those that academia has delivered. Narrowing the gaps will bene­t industry, academia, and fresh graduates. Senior management teams for a typical company normally spend over 60% of their time on management of talent. The strategies for recruiting, retraining and retaining talent will be key factors for business success. Some scenarios will be illustrated to help fresh graduates become the kind of qualified talent sought after by industry. Speaker Jeff Zhu, currently serves as an AVP at Neusoft America, based in Seattle.

Thursday, October 30:  Master of Science in Finance Information Session
Time: 5:30pm    Place: Segal Graduate School, 500 Granville St.   Cost: Free  register

Interested in graduate business school or know a colleague or friend who might be? Build a solid business foundation with our Master of Science in Finance, a full-time program that prepares candidates for the challenges of the rapidly changing world of finance.

Thursday, October 30:  Strategic Litigation and the Judicial Constraints of Public Engagement
Time: 7pm   Place: Rm. 7000, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

This talk will examine strategic lawsuits, their democratic implications, and the potential for regulation.

Byron Sheldrick is the chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph where he has taught since 2006. Before that he taught in the politics department at the University of Winnipeg and the law department at Keele University in the United Kingdom.  His research focuses on the political economy of the law-politics relationship, with an emphasis on the utilization of law by social movements to pursue social and political change.

Saturday, November 1: Free Saturday Forum—Snap, Crackle and Pop!: A Short History of Noise
Time: 1:30pm   Place: Rm. 1900, Habour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.    Cost: Free  register

The word “noise” is often synonymous with “nuisance,” which implies something to be avoided as much as possible. We label blaring sirens, the space between stations on the radio dial and the din of a busy street as “noise.” Is “noise” simply a sound we don’t like? How have scientists defined noise? And is there ever a time when a noisy system is desirable? With Shawn Michael Bullock.

Sunday, November 2:  Last Candidate Standing
Time: 2pm    Place: Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free  register

Back by popular demand, Last Candidate Standing – a unique event that is open to each and every candidate running for mayor and council. Last Candidate Standing is an election ‘mixer.’ It allows incumbents and new nominees, independents and party-affiliated candidates to share the same stage, answer questions, and showcase their political chops.

Monday, November 3:  Executive MBA Information Session
Time: 12pm   Place: Segal Graduate School, 500 Granville St.   Cost: Free  register

Interested in graduate business school or know a colleague or friend who might be? Build a solid business foundation with our Executive MBA program, a part-time program in strategic decision-making for mid to senior level managers.

Tuesday, November 4:  City of Vancouver 2014 Mayoral Candidates Debate
Time: 7pm   Place: Rm. 1400, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free  register

Join SFU Public Square as four candidates for Mayor of Vancouver debate the most important issues facing the city in an evening presented in partnership with the Vancouver Sun.

The participating candidates are Bob Kasting (Independent), Kirk LaPointe (Non-Partisan Association), incumbent Mayor Gregor Robertson (Vision Vancouver) and Meena Wong (Coalition of Progressive Electors). Candidates will be questioned by panelists Maureen Maloney, a professor in SFU’s School of Public Policy and Jeff Lee, Vancouver Sun City Hall reporter. Sun Editor-in-Chief Harold Munro will moderate the debate.

Wednesday, November 5:  Information Session: SFU NOW (Nights or Weekends)
Time: 5pm   Place: Rm. 7000, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free register

Learn more about how to complete your degree without disrupting your career. SFU NOW: Nights or Weekends is a pathway for you as a working adult to earn a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in the evenings and on weekends in Vancouver or Surrey.

Wednesday, November 5:  Rawi Hage – Opening Reception and Reading
Time: 7pm   Place: Djavad Mowafaghain World Art Centre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

Rawi Hage was born in Beirut and lived through nine years of the Lebanese civil war. He is a writer, a visual artist, and a curator, and he resides in Montreal. First published in Canada, De Niro's Game was a finalist for that nation's top literary prizes—the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General's Literary Award, the Writers' Trust Award, and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize—and won the McAuslan First Book Prize and the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Wednesday, November 5:  VSAFF: Miners Shot Down
Time: 7pm   Place: Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: $10 online

In August 2012, mineworkers in one of South Africa’s biggest platinum mines began a wildcat strike for better wages. Six days later the police used live ammunition to brutally suppress the strike, killing 34 and injuring many more.

Using the point of view of the Marikana miners, Miners Shot Down follows the strike from day one, showing the courageous but isolated fight waged by a group of low-paid workers against the combined forces of the mining company Lonmin, the ANC government and their allies in the National Union of Mineworkers.

Wednesday, November 5:  Making Space for Indigenous Urbanism, R. Walker
Time: 7:30pm  Place: Rm. 1400, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.  Cost: Free register

Urbanists of the 20th c. focused on Indigenous "urbanization" into the colonial city from reserves and rural communities. Urbanists of the 21st c. must develop new concepts and tools to support Indigenous "urbanism", or put another way, the participation in and enjoyment of an urban life. This public talk will share examples of how space is being made in Canadian and New Zealand cities for Indigenous urbanism. These range from small-scale intercultural practices between Indigenous peoples and immigrant newcomers in neighbourhoods, to large-scale relationship-building and governance processes between municipal governments and Indigenous communities.

Thursday, November 6:  Dr. Christoph Neumann: The Mevlevi Dervishes and the Ottomans: How Did an Intellectual Network Contribute to the Integration of an Early Modern Empire
Time: 7pm   Place: Rm. 1400, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St.    Cost: Free  register

The Mevlevi order of dervishes operated as a specifically Ottoman institution, as its affiliates often belonged to the Ottoman elite. Members of Muslim Ottoman elites had often to be mobile as their career required them to change places. The convents of the order, located just outside of many urban centres in the Empire, were open to all Mevlevis and served as a network in this situation. Dr. Christoph Neumann’s lecture examines how this network functioned.

Thursday, November 6:  The Saga of Life: Notes from the Front Line of a Magnificent Mass Extinction
Time: 7pm  Place: Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue, 580 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

With Dr. Shahid Naeem, Professor of Ecology, Columbia University. 14 billion years ago the Big Bang gave rise to stellar kitchens that would cook up a brilliant menu of over a hundred elements, a few of which would eventually aggregate into a single microscopic life form on Earth. In this presentation, we will consider the saga of life, the biosphere, details of our mass extinction, and what the humanities and natural sciences (the “two cultures”) have to tell us about our options for our future.

Thursday, November 6:  Matt Hern: Sports, Creativity and the Radical Imagination
Time: 7pm   Place: Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

Often derided as a subaltern opiate, sports need to be understood as containing huge social and cultural power, and possibilities that are condescended to at our peril. For many of us, sports, as both spectators and participants, is the very best site for confronting race, sex, gender and class privileges.

Matt argues for a vastly expanded definition of creativity that includes sports for sure, but also all kinds of everyday and common activities. Radical social change relies on our imaginations, and we need to be nurturing every kind of creative activity, especially material collisions, as we make and remake the world around us.

Friday, November 7:   Interesting Vancouver 2014
Time: 6pm   Place: Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.  Cost: $25  online

Catalyzing creativity, community and capacity. More than another "sage on the stage" lecture series, Interesting Vancouver is an event that celebrates the uncelebrated, expands the collective vision of what is uniquely possible, and gives people an opportunity to discover interesting new creative pursuits they can apply in their own lives.

October 21-November 1:   A Dream Play
Time: 8pm  Place: Fei & Milton Wong Experimental Theatre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: $5-$15  online

Abstract and fast flowing, A Dream Play replicates the disjointed shape of a dream, in which the story itself unfolds. Following Agnes, a god’s daughter, and her experience when she descends to earth to find out what it is like to be human. In doing so she witnesses both the joy and depravity of human experience. Confronted with different sorts of suffering, she is forced to realize that gods should pity humans. Her return to heaven signals an awakening from the dream-like state.

Strindberg originally wrote A Dream Play in 1901, it remains one of his most admired works and is widely regarded to have had a huge influence on later modernist drama. This adaptation is by Caryl Churchill, and was first performed at the National Theatre, London in 2005.

November 1-2:   Heart of the City Festival: Thee Ahs | Sawagi Taiko & Tzo 'kam
Time: 8pm   Place: Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

The upcoming 2014 Festival features a feast of twelve days of music, stories, songs, poetry, cultural celebrations, films, theatre, dance, processions, spoken word, forums, workshops, discussions, gallery exhibits, mixed media, history walks and an array of artists.

October 30-November 21:  Directing Projects Fall 2014
Time: 7 & 9pm   Place: Fei & Milton Wong Experimental Theatre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings St.   Cost: Free

Directing projects by students from FPA 453. Including:

Two Iphigenia Plays
by Ellen McLaughlin
directed by Ashley Aron
October 30 & 31, 7 & 9 PM

The Governor of the Dew
by Floyd Favel
directed by Deneh Thompson
November 6 & 7, 7 & 9 PM

16670
by Erik Ehn
directed by Dan O’Shea

Sganarelle
by Molière
directed by Cathy Falkner
November 13 & 14, 7 & 9 PM

The Love Talker
by Deborah Pryor
directed by Keely O’Brien
November 20 & 21, 7 & 9 PM

October 15-December 13:  Ricardo Basbaum: The Production of the Artist as a Collective Conversation
Time: Gallery hours  Place: Audain Gallery, 149 West Hastings St.  Cost: Free

Since the early 1990s, Brazilian artist Ricardo Basbaum has incited artistic encounters by inviting people to engage with and respond to systems of symbols and rules embedded in objects, scripts, diagrams, maps and games. In his projects, Basbaum quotes artistic and graphic communication tactics that are both vernacular and abstract, thereby easy to learn, interpret and memorize. Through interaction with these fluid sets of visual and linguistic terms for the production of an artwork, Basbaum seeks to collectively consider the material, social and spatial membrane between artist, contemporary art system, art object and participant. The Production of the Artist as a Collective Conversation is an emerging exhibition that frames the gallery as a critical site of pedagogical and artistic production.